New Respect Watches Lovers For Quartz Movement Watches!

In the 1970s and 1980s, the population of watchmakers, particularly in the USA, dropped off to “endangered species” numbers. If it had been 20 years later, you’d have college kids chaining themselves to Macy’s Department store, demanding that we “save the watchmakers.” This snobbery carried into the 1990s, and the new breed of watch enthusiasts looked down their collective noses at quartz watches. It might also be a good moment to look at the aBlogtoWatch list of the top 10 most important electronic watches.
The “group think” by watch lovers about quartz watches was (and is) that these preposterous pieces of plastic, metal, and batteries – by an amazing quirk of fate – were only worn by “geeks and losers.” It was like wearing socks and sandals! And to do so meant you lacked some level of taste and sophistication.
Quartz watches are more accurate than their mechanical counterparts. While mechanical and automatic watches built today are accurate enough, gaining or losing a few seconds per day, a quartz watch can remain accurate within a few seconds per year. A few seconds a day might not seem like much but consider this: a difference of five seconds per day could equal a full half-hour during that year.
Now for even more science. If you’re wondering whether a quartz watches is the most accurate timepiece there is, the answer is not quite. That honor goes to an atomic clock, which uses frequencies in the microwave, optical, or ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, making it the frequency standard for timekeeping, as well as useful in television broadcast signals and GPS. But quartz watches are pretty darn close. How about another science factoid? The National Institute of Science and Technology’s (NIST) new atomic clock is so precise scientists have to come up with a new method of measuring gravity to use all its capabilities! Wrist-sized models are not expected to be available, ever.